Blog / News

A Desert Ramble

Last week Park Volunteer Naturalist Ted led a “ramble” to Big Spring. Ted knows a lot (A LOT!) about our desert’s natural history, its plants, geology, and ecology. He is the real deal and filled our brains with countless interesting facts.

Yurts are built!

After several adventures with the high desert winds and the yurts used for Camp Borrego, it seems we have finally found a solution. Today ABF completed construction on the final of six yurts for camp.

ABF is lucky to have several talented and dedicated volunteers who spent many hours building yurts. Our special thanks to Mark Jorgensen, Chuck Bennett, Herb Stone, Ray Mouton, Dick Troy, Ray Shindler, Steve Bier, Dick Helvig, Mike Puzzo and Jack Jorgensen for their sweat and time.

Finding Fall in Anza-Borrego

I am not from the desert. I’m originally a flatlander and since I left home I have really missed the seasons I grew up with. Fall there is lovely- you get to break out sweaters and coats and thick wool scarves; you can see your breath in the crisp autumn air; watch as the hills come alive with the reds, oranges, and browns characteristic of the season; and feel the leaves crunch under your feet as you walk.

 

Monsoon Turns Desert Green ~ A lovely anomaly for an early, cooling autumn in the desert.

BORREGO SPRINGS, CA (September 23, 2013): Usually, the pull of the desert in September is the vision of dazzling stars popping out of the dark skies while you lay on your back in a warm pool. But this September there's an unusual bonus-green days! That's right. Monsoon rains deluged the desert at the end of August and two weeks later the desert floor is a carpet of green and gold with wild ocotillo branches bursting with leaves. The last time monsoons gave this kind of green gift was in 1997.

Sphinx Moths

Hornworms in Culp Valley

If you’ve been up to Culp Valley or any nearby areas in ABDSP lately, you may have seen some bright caterpillars on plants or even inching their way across the road. These expressive green guys are known as hornworms. They acquired the name hornworm because of the stiff pointy dorsal near the end of their last body segment. Another common name for them are Tomato Hornworms, because they can quickly eat their way through tomato plants.

Subscribe to Blog / News