Archaeology Weekend

Date: 
Saturday, April 2, 2016 - 9:00am to Sunday, April 3, 2016 - 5:00pm

Join the Colorado Desert Archaeology Society and Anza-Borrego Desert State Park for a weekend filled with the archaeology of this beautiful desert. Events will be happening on Saturday and Sunday outside of the Visitor Center, presentations will be happening in the Discovery Lab inside the Visitor Center on Saturday, and field trips will be run on Sunday to different areas of the Ancient Lake Cahuilla Area.

Schedule of Events

Saturday, April 02, 2016 

9:30 - 4:00

Guided Tours of the Archaeology Lab. Conducted by Colorado Desert Archaeology Society volunteers. Groups depart from the Visitor Center front door approximately every half hour.

10-4:00    

Native American Basket and Pottery Display.  (Craft items for sale)

Pottery Making Demonstration and Kids’ Activities - Includes clay grinding with paddle and anvil construction techniques. By CDAS Archaeology volunteers.  (Clay will be available for spectator participation)

Demonstration Table on Uses of Native Plants for Food, Medicine and Construction by the Kumeyaay Tribes of San Diego County & Baja California.  By Suzanne Emery. 

Pictograph Stories – Students of all ages will look at pictographs and then try to decode the pictograph story. They will then create their own story and transfer it to a rock to take home. By CDAS volunteers        

4-5:00    

Free Ice Cream Social - Ice cream sundaes and root beer floats in the Nierenberg Plaza at Visitor Center.        

Presentations

10 – 11  

The story of Ancient Lake Cahuilla.  Behind the desert we see today lies millions of years of water – the ocean and ancient Lake Cahuilla have shaped the geological and cultural history of southern California both past and present.  By Dr. Neal V. Hitch, Director, Imperial Valley Desert Museum, Ocotillo, California.

11- 12    

Who Lived on the Lake Cahuilla Shorelines?  Among the occupants of Lake Cahuilla’s shorelines were ancestors of the modern Cahuilla and Kumeyaay, but the picture of regional prehistory seems to have been considerably more complex (and more interesting) than that might suggest. By Don Laylander - Senior Archaeologist at ASM Affiliates in Carlsbad.  

1 – 2

Before Lake Cahuilla; in the Ocotillo Wells State Vehicular Recreation Area (SVRA) - The overwhelming body of research in the OW SVRA has focused on the formation of ancient Lake Cahuilla during the Late Prehistoric period. However, ongoing research is revealing the possibility of significantly earlier occupations. By Dr. Jim Cassidy, Associate State Archaeologist, Ocotillo Wells SVRA

2 – 3      

Preserving and Protecting the Ancient Lake Cahuilla Shoreline: The State Park’s Mission - The preservation and protection of the valuable cultural resources of the Ancient Lake Cahuilla/Freeman Property is an important part of the Park’s mission. What part can the Parks play in interpreting these resources? By Robin Connors – Associate State Archaeologist, Colorado Desert District

3 – 4      

Ancient Lake Cahuilla Forum – Open discussion on the Cultural Implications of ancient Lake Cahuilla.

Sunday, April 03, 2016

9 – 12      

Native American Basket and Pottery Display.  (Craft items for sale)

9:30 -12   

Guided Tours of the Archaeology Lab. Groups depart Visitor Center front door approximately every half hour.    

10 - 12     

Pottery Making Demonstration - Includes clay grinding with paddle and anvil construction techniques. By CDAS Archaeology volunteers.  (Clay will be available for spectator participation)

Demonstration Table on Uses of Native Plants for Food, Medicine & Construction by the Kumeyaay Tribes of San Diego County & Baja California.  By Suzanne Emery.

Presentations

10-11      

From a Ranger’s Point of View:  Working Together Towards Protecting our Cultural Heritages- A Historical Perspective.  By Ranger Steve Bier (This program is especially for KIDS & their parents)

11-12    

Breaking Point. This film tells the story of the worst environmental disaster in US history that is quickly approaching, yet very little is being done to stop it. The receding Salton Sea (the smaller body of water that replaced ancient Lake Cahuilla) reveals a toxic mix of fine dust and chemicals that is threatening the health of millions. Directed By:  Bill Wisneski - Palomar College TV

Field Trips                                

9:30 - 1:30      

The Fishtraps, a Riverside County Archaeological Preserve:  We will see rock art, circular rock depressions (thought to be fishtraps), old lake levels, the “bathtub ring” and other indications of Ancient Lake Cahuilla. The trip will depart from the back parking lot at the Visitor Center at 9:30 AM and will return by 1:30 PM. The drive to the Fishtraps takes a little less than one hour. Once at the location, there is a short hike to the site (about 1/4 mile over relatively flat terrain with rocky surface).  Car pooling is recommended. Bring a snack, water, and comfortable hiking shoes and other gear. (Limited to 25 people). Trip led by CDAS volunteer Dr. Joan Schneider, Retired Associate State Archaeologist for Colorado Desert District.

9:00 - 2:30   

Tour the Imperial Valley Desert Museum.  Explore the new Land of Extremes exhibits.  Of special interest is a 9,000 year old roasting hearth found in Jacumba and an interactive topographic map that illustrates the millions of years of water in the Imperial Valley. Drive time to museum is 1-1/2 hours, the distance is 70 miles. Meet in the back parking lot of the Visitor Center for a 9:00 departure to the museum. Estimated time of return would be 2:30. Car pooling is recommended. (Limited to 25 people)  Bring a snack, water, lunch. At the location there will bepicnic tables for lunches. Museum Tours given by Anne Morgan, IVDM Curator and Marcie Rodriguez, IVDM Education Coordinator. 

Pre-registration required for the field trips. For reservations call 760-767-0446 ext 1003. During Archaeology Weekend, check for last-minute field trip openings at the ABF table in front of the Visitor Center. Wear hiking shoes and bring a hat and plenty of water.